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High relatedness of invasive multi-drug resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella genotypes among patients and asymptomatic carriers in endemic informal settlements in Kenya

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dc.contributor.author Kariuki, S. en_US
dc.contributor.author Mbae, C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Van Puyvelde, S. en_US
dc.contributor.author Onsare, R. en_US
dc.contributor.author Kavai, S. en_US
dc.contributor.author Wairimu, C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Ngetich, R. en_US
dc.contributor.author Clemens, J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Dougan, G. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-25T09:37:53Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-25T09:37:53Z
dc.date.issued 2020 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1935-2727 en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008440 en_US
dc.identifier.other ITG-B3A; DBM; U-DIABAC; JIF; DOI; CPDF; Abstract; ITMPUB; DSPACE68 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10390/10855
dc.description.abstract Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a major public health challenge, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). In Kenya, mortality rates are high (20-25%) unless prompt treatment is instituted. The most common serotypes are Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). In a 5 year case-control study in children residing in the Mukuru informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya, a total of 4201 blood cultures from suspected iNTS cases and 6326 fecal samples from age-matched controls were studied. From the laboratory cultures we obtained a total of 133 S. Typhimurium isolates of which 83(62.4%) came from cases (53 blood and 30 fecal) and 50(37.6%) from controls (fecal). A total of 120 S. Enteritidis consisted of 70(58.3%) from cases (43 blood and 27 fecal) and 50(41.7%) from controls (fecal). The S. Typhimurium population fell into two distinct ST19 lineages constituting 36.1%, as well as ST313 lineage I (27.8%) and ST313 lineage II (36.1%) isolates. The S. Enteritidis isolates fell into the global epidemic lineage (46.6%), the Central/Eastern African lineage (30.5%), a novel Kenyan-specific lineage (12.2%) and a phylogenetically outlier lineage (10.7%). Detailed phylogenetic analysis revealed a high level of relatedness between NTS from blood and stool originating from cases and controls, indicating a common source pool. Multidrug resistance was common throughout, with 8.5% of such isolates resistant to extended spectrum beta lactams. The high rate of asymptomatic carriage in the population is a concern for transmission to vulnerable individuals and this group could be targeted for vaccination if an iNTS vac.cine becomes available. en_US
dc.language English en_US
dc.relation.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32745137 en_US
dc.subject Salmonellosis en_US
dc.subject Bacterial diseases en_US
dc.subject Drug resistance en_US
dc.subject Kenya en_US
dc.subject Africa-East en_US
dc.title High relatedness of invasive multi-drug resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella genotypes among patients and asymptomatic carriers in endemic informal settlements in Kenya en_US
dc.type Article-E en_US
dc.citation.issue 8 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases en_US
dc.citation.volume 14 en_US
dc.citation.pages e0008440 en_US
dc.citation.abbreviation PLoS Negl Trop Dis en_US


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