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Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates in The Gambia and Senegal

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dc.contributor.author Dione, M. M.
dc.contributor.author Ikumapayi, U.
dc.contributor.author Saha, D.
dc.contributor.author Mohammed, N. I.
dc.contributor.author Adegbola, R. A.
dc.contributor.author Geerts, S.
dc.contributor.author Ieven, M.
dc.contributor.author Antonio, M.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-29T10:18:42Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-29T10:18:42Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.issn 1972-2680
dc.identifier.other ITG-A1B
dc.identifier.other ITG-A6A
dc.identifier.other U-VPROT
dc.identifier.other FTA
dc.identifier.other Abstract
dc.identifier.other UPD40
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10390/6728
dc.description.abstract INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of virulence genes in non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and its association with commonly used antibiotics in West Africa is unknown. METHODOLOGY: We tested 185 NTS isolates from children, animals, and food products for the presence of twelve virulence genes by PCR. Ten of the virulence genes tested belonged to the five Salmonella pathogenicity islands implicated in its pathogenesis. RESULTS: Ten of twelve virulence genes except sopE and pefA were present in at least 70% of the isolates tested; sopE and pefA were observed in 33% and 44% of the isolates, respectively. The most prevalent gene was invA (99.5%), which is an invasion gene conserved within the Salmonella enterica. pipD and sopB genes, which were associated with serovar Enteritidis, were detected in 92.4% and 94.1% of isolates respectively. S. Istanbul and S. Javiana, which were isolated from chicken-serving restaurants, carried all the virulence genes of the five pathogenicity islands. There was significant association between sopB, sitC, orfLC, pipD and pefA virulence genes and resistance to commonly used antibiotics in Senegal and The Gambia, namely amoxicillin, ticarcillin, trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, trimethoprim, spectinomycin, streptomycin, sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that virulence genes are present in NTS strains isolated from various sources. The significant association between some virulence genes and antibiotic resistance may have important implications with regard to the spread and persistence of resistance and virulence genes in Salmonella and to the prudent use of antimicrobial agents in humans and animals in West Africa. en
dc.language English en
dc.subject Bacterial diseases en
dc.subject Salmonella en
dc.subject Salmonella enterica en
dc.subject Salmonella Istanbul en
dc.subject Salmonella Javiana en
dc.subject Epidemiology en
dc.subject Etiology en
dc.subject Children en
dc.subject Animals en
dc.subject Testing en
dc.subject Polymerase chain reaction en
dc.subject PCR en
dc.subject Virulence en
dc.subject Strains en
dc.subject Pathogenicity en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Antimicrobial resistance en
dc.subject Serovars en
dc.subject Gambia en
dc.subject Senegal en
dc.subject Africa, West en
dc.title Antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates in The Gambia and Senegal en
dc.type Article-E en
dc.citation.issue 11 en
dc.citation.jtitle Journal of Infection in Developing Countries en
dc.citation.volume 5 en
dc.citation.pages 765-775 en
dc.identifier.pmid http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22112729
dc.citation.jabbreviation J Infect Dev Countries en


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