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Malaria parasite detection increases during pregnancy in wild chimpanzees

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dc.contributor.author De Nys, H. M.
dc.contributor.author Calvignac-Spencer, S.
dc.contributor.author Boesch, C.
dc.contributor.author Dorny, P.
dc.contributor.author Wittig, R. M.
dc.contributor.author Mundry, R.
dc.contributor.author Leendertz, F. H.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-16T12:00:08Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-16T12:00:08Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.issn 1475-2875
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-13-413
dc.identifier.other ITG-B4A
dc.identifier.other DBM
dc.identifier.other U-VHELM
dc.identifier.other JIF
dc.identifier.other DOI
dc.identifier.other FTA
dc.identifier.other OAJ
dc.identifier.other E-only
dc.identifier.other Abstract
dc.identifier.other UPD57
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10390/8205
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The diversity of malaria parasites (Plasmodium sp.) infecting chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and their close relatedness with those infecting humans is well documented. However, their biology is still largely unexplored and there is a need for baseline epidemiological data. Here, the effect of pregnancy, a well-known risk factor for malaria in humans, on the susceptibility of female chimpanzees to malaria infection was investigated. METHODS: A series of 384 faecal samples collected during 40 pregnancies and 36 post-pregnancies from three habituated groups of wild chimpanzees in the Tai National Park, Cote d'Ivoire, were tested. Samples were tested for malaria parasites by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Data were analysed using a generalized linear mixed model. RESULTS: Probability of malaria parasite detection significantly increased towards the end of pregnancy and decreased with the age of the mother. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that susceptibility to malaria parasite infection increases during pregnancy, and, as shown before, in younger individuals, which points towards similar dynamics of malaria parasite infection in human and chimpanzee populations and raises questions about the effects of such infections on pregnancy outcome and offspring morbidity/mortality. en_US
dc.language English en_US
dc.subject Protozoal diseases en_US
dc.subject Malaria en_US
dc.subject Plasmodium en_US
dc.subject Vectors en_US
dc.subject Mosquitoes en_US
dc.subject Anopheles en_US
dc.subject Chimpanzees en_US
dc.subject Disease susceptibility en_US
dc.subject Female en_US
dc.subject Risk factors en_US
dc.subject Probabilities en_US
dc.subject Pregnancy en_US
dc.subject Age en_US
dc.subject Infectivity en_US
dc.subject Côte d'Ivoire en_US
dc.subject Africa, West en_US
dc.title Malaria parasite detection increases during pregnancy in wild chimpanzees en_US
dc.type Article-E en_US
dc.citation.issue 413 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Malaria Journal en_US
dc.citation.volume 13 en_US
dc.citation.pages 1-6 en_US
dc.identifier.pmid http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25331753
dc.identifier.url http://www.malariajournal.com/content/13/1/413
dc.citation.jabbreviation Malar J en_US


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