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Incremental cost of implementing residual insecticide treatment with delthametrine on top of intensive routine Aedes aegypti control

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dc.contributor.author Baly, A.
dc.contributor.author Gonzalez, K.
dc.contributor.author Cabrera, P.
dc.contributor.author Popa, J. C.
dc.contributor.author Toledo, M. E.
dc.contributor.author Hernandez, C.
dc.contributor.author Montada, D.
dc.contributor.author Vanlerberghe, V.
dc.contributor.author Van der Stuyft, P.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-03T12:18:31Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-03T12:18:31Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.issn 1360-2276
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12693
dc.identifier.other ITG-H8A
dc.identifier.other ITG-HLA
dc.identifier.other DPH
dc.identifier.other U-HPOL
dc.identifier.other JIF
dc.identifier.other DOI
dc.identifier.other FTB
dc.identifier.other Abstract
dc.identifier.other UPD62
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10390/8917
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: Information on the cost of implementing residual insecticide treatment (RIT) for Aedes control is scarce. We evaluated the incremental cost on top of intensive conventional routine activities of the Aedes control programme (ACP) in the city of Santiago de Cuba, Cuba. METHODS: We conducted the cost analysis study in 2011-2012, from the perspective of the ACP. Data sources were bookkeeping records, activity registers of the Provincial ACP Centre, and the accounts of an RIT implementation study in 21 clusters of on average 4 house blocks comprising 5,180 premises. RESULTS: The annual cost of the routine ACP activities was 19.66 US$ per household. RIT applications in rounds at 4 month-intervals covering, on average, 97.2% and using 8.5 g of delthametrine annually per household, cost 3.06 US$ per household per year. Delthametrine comprised 66.5% of this cost; the additional cost for deploying RIT comprised 15.6% of the total ACP routine cost and 27% of the cost related to routine adult stage Aedes control. CONCLUSIONS: The incremental cost of implementing RIT is high. It should be weighed against the incremental effect on the burden caused by the array of pathogens transmitted by Aedes. The cost could be reduced if the insecticide became cheaper, by limiting the number of yearly applications or by targeting transmission hot spots. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. en_US
dc.language English en_US
dc.subject Viral diseases en_US
dc.subject Dengue en_US
dc.subject Vectors en_US
dc.subject Mosquitoes en_US
dc.subject Aedes aegypti en_US
dc.subject Vector control en_US
dc.subject Control programs en_US
dc.subject Cost analysis en_US
dc.subject Residual spraying en_US
dc.subject Deltamethrin en_US
dc.subject Implementation en_US
dc.subject Integrated control en_US
dc.subject Cuba en_US
dc.subject Caribbean en_US
dc.subject America, Latin en_US
dc.title Incremental cost of implementing residual insecticide treatment with delthametrine on top of intensive routine Aedes aegypti control en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.citation.issue 5 en_US
dc.citation.jtitle Tropical Medicine and International Health en_US
dc.citation.volume 21 en_US
dc.citation.pages 597-602 en_US
dc.identifier.pmid http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26996279
dc.citation.jabbreviation Trop Med Int Health en_US


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